weirdscout

lawa7di:

Western onlookers have a very firm notion of the trajectory along which LGBTQ rights should advance. That trajectory places trans rights as a clear “next step,” something that can only be achieved once the groundwork has been laid by the advancement of the “L,” “G,” and perhaps “B” contingencies (representing lesbian, gay, and bisexual, respectively). But the Lebanese courts are not following that trajectory. The same ruling that decriminalized homosexuality also formally recognized gender variation and codified principles of self-identification. This nuanced view of the interplay between sexuality and gender identification doesn’t fit with the traditional (Western) “gay rights” narrative, and has resulted in Western media coverage that almost completely silences the critical role a transwoman played in achieving this landmark ruling.

Proclaiming Lebanon’s ruling as merely a “victory for gays” is not only an insult to the trans issues underpinning the ruling, but also whitewashes the Lebanese LGBTQ movement, painting it with strokes more easily digestible by Western consumers. The Lebanese case was not and is not merely a “victories for gays” – it is a nuanced and praise-worthy assessment of gender variance. While critics have commented that the ruling falls short of tangible “rights” for gays, in many ways it also far surpasses mainstream Western understandings of gender identity. And this deserves some press.

mineralists
mineralogue:

Prehnite is a low-grade metamorphic silicate mineral usually forming as stalactitic, globular, or botryoidal aggregates. It rarely forms crystals. It has a chemical formula of Ca2Al2Si3O10(OH)2. It is translucent and usually colourless, grey, yellow to yellow-green, or white. A rare orange variety was discovered at the Kalahari Manganese Fields in South Africa.
Prehnite has a Mohs hardness of 6-6.5 and a specific gravity of 2.8-2.95. Prehnite fluoresces blue-white or mild peach under short UV radiation and yellow under longwave UV. It has a colourless streak. It is classified under two different silicate structures: inosilicate by the Strunz classification scheme, where it is stated that the mineral is transitional between the inosilicate “chain silicate” structure and phyllosilicate “ring silicate” structure, and phyllosilicate by the Dana scheme, under sheet silicates with four-membered rings.
Sources:
Wikipedia
Mindat
Webmineral
Image: Prehnite from Sadiola Hill, Kayes Region, Mali. Source: irocks.com

mineralogue:

Prehnite is a low-grade metamorphic silicate mineral usually forming as stalactitic, globular, or botryoidal aggregates. It rarely forms crystals. It has a chemical formula of Ca2Al2Si3O10(OH)2. It is translucent and usually colourless, grey, yellow to yellow-green, or white. A rare orange variety was discovered at the Kalahari Manganese Fields in South Africa.

Prehnite has a Mohs hardness of 6-6.5 and a specific gravity of 2.8-2.95. Prehnite fluoresces blue-white or mild peach under short UV radiation and yellow under longwave UV. It has a colourless streak. It is classified under two different silicate structures: inosilicate by the Strunz classification scheme, where it is stated that the mineral is transitional between the inosilicate “chain silicate” structure and phyllosilicate “ring silicate” structure, and phyllosilicate by the Dana scheme, under sheet silicates with four-membered rings.

Sources:

Image: Prehnite from Sadiola Hill, Kayes Region, Mali. Source: irocks.com

swanfarts

ladiesmakingcomics:

theladybadass:

Jackie Ormes (August 1, 1911 – December 26, 1985) is known as the first African American female cartoonist. Her strips, featuring the lovable characters Torchy Brown, Candy, Patty-Jo, and Ginger, appeared in the Chicago Defender and Pittsburgh Courier in the 1930s - 1950s. 

Jackie Ormes said, “No more…Sambos…Just KIDS!” and she transformed her attractive, spunky Patty-Jo cartoon character into the first upscale American black doll. At long last, here was an African American doll with all the play features children desired: playable hair, and the finest and most extensive wardrobe on the market, with all manner of dresses, formals, shoes, hats, nightgowns, robes, skating and cowgirl costumes, and spring and winter coat sets, to name a few. (Jackie Ormes Online)

I finally got Nancy Goldstein’s biography of Jackie Ormes for Christmas, and it’s fascinating stuff. I love that we have this video (or gifset of a video) of her at work. It is rare enough to see footage of any women cartoonists from this era, even fewer with merchandise based on their work. Jackie Ormes’s importance to the history of both women cartoonists and black cartoonists cannot be understated.

mythandrists
[Dionysus] himself is unimaginable without his followers but does not resemble them. He is seldom drunk, seldom mad, never sexually aroused. The relationship with Ariadne, often depicted, is dignified and restrained. Even in grim situations he retains a smiling tranquility which comes suddenly to seem sinister. (Was he a model for Plato’s portrayal of Socrates?) The calmness of the god of madness is a characteristic Dionysian paradox. His followers surrender their individuality in the collective excitement. But they do not achieve union with the source of that excitement, however close they may seem to approach. Dionysus eludes them, and retains his enigmatic smile.
Polytheism and Society at Athens, by Robert Parker (via neverfeedthesarcophagi)